Liz Cheney is ready to reveal Republican colleagues who asked Trump for presidential pardons after the January 6 riot

Liz Cheney is ready to reveal Republican colleagues who asked Trump for presidential pardons after the January 6 riot


Rep. Liz Cheney, vice chair of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, and Committee Chair Bennie Thomson take their seats during the panel’s fifth hearing on Thursday.Win McNamee/Getty Images

  • Former White House staff identified 4 GOP lawmakers who sought January 6-related pardons.

  • Liz Cheney previously named Republican Rep. Scott Perry as one pardon seeker.

  • Witnesses testified that several MAGA lawmakers inquired about potential pardons.

Republican Reps. Mat Gaetz of Florida, Mo Brooks of Alabama, Andy Biggs of Arizona, and Scott Perry of Pennsylvania all asked Donald Trump to pardon them for helping him try to overturn the 2020 election, forming White House aides said in a series of taped statements presented Thursday on Capitol Hill.

Trump White House aides John McEntee, Cassidy Hutchinson, and Eric Herschmann mapped out how the four House lawmakers — most of whom have already been subpoenaed by the select committee — asked for legal cover from future prosecution in a montage of clips the January 6 select committee played during its fifth public hearing.

Committee staff posted an image of an email Brooks sent administration officials, the subject being “Pardons.”

January 6 select committee staff displayed an image of an email Rep.  Mo Brooks of Alabama allegedly sent the White House requesting presidential pardons for MAGA lawmakers during the panel's fifth public hearing on Thursday, June 23.

January 6 select committee staff displayed an image of an email Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama allegedly sent the White House requesting presidential pardons for MAGA lawmakers during the panel’s fifth public hearing on Thursday, June 23.Warren Rojas/Insider

In it, Brooks says he’s writing on behalf of Gaetz, and urges Trump to “give general (all purpose) pardons to the following groups of people: Every Congressman and Senate who voted to reject the electoral college vote submissions of Arizona and Pennsylvania.”

Hutchinson, who worked for then-White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, testified that Gaetz, Brooks, Perry, Biggs, and Perry all asked for pardons. She said Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio had discussed potential pardons, but never specifically asked for one. And Hutchinson said she thought Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia may have approached Trump White House counsel Patrick Philbin about a pardon, but she wasn’t sure about that.

January 6 select committee co-chair Liz Cheney promised to end the panel’s fifth public hearing by naming names of the congressional Republicans who allegedly wanted Trump to shield them from the fallout of the attack on the US Capitol.

“At the close of today’s hearing, we will see video testimony of three members of Donald Trump’s White House staff. They will identify certain members of Congress who contacted the White House after January 6 seeking presidential pardons,” the Wyoming Republican said Thursday during her opening remarks.

Cheney teased during the panel’s first hearing that investigators had uncovered evidence of sitting members of Congress lobbying the embattled former president to clear them of any wrongdoing before leaving office, naming Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania, specifically, as one of the petitioners.

Perry, who has been subpoenaed by the committee regarding his interaction with former Justice Department official Jeff Clark, denied the accusation.

“The notion that I ever sought a Presidential pardon for myself or other Members of Congress is an absolute, shameless, and soulless lie,” Perry wrote on social media.

Trump’s ill-fated attempt to install Clark as acting attorney general in order to advance his campaign’s bogus election fraud strategy is the focal point of Thursday’s hearing on the former president’s bid to tamper with the DOJ.

Read the original article on Business Insider



Source link